Thursday, January 17, 2019

Sea Ivory (resource)

Also known as morse, a form of inferior ivory obtained from the tusks of walrus (by far the largest source), narwhal, remoraz, dragons and other monsterous beasts, typically associated with the Arctic Sea.  The tusks of a walrus may attain one meter; a dragon's tooth may grow to a comparable size on some species.  Walrus teeth are also commercially traded.  A walrus tooth has a rounded, irregular peg shape and is typically two inches in length.

Carving and engraving sea ivory is an important folk art (see Sculpture), creating small figures, chessmen, jewelry and the like.

The world's total yield of sea ivory is 7,417 stone, with 5 sources reporting. The total value of sea ivory equals 75,443 g.p. annually (10.17 g.p. per stone).

As treasure, 1½ lbs. of plundered sea ivory = 1 x.p.

The most important trade center for sea ivory is Finnemar, in the north of Ulthua, upon the Barents Sea, which markets 60% of the world's supply.  Further east, Samoyadia provides a supply for central Asia, India and China.  In Europe, the most significant supply is marketed at Bayonne, in Lower Navarre, the port of entry as designated by the King of France.

See Resources

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Turtles (resource)

A very rare delicacy, rarely found and considered a delicacy in a number of cultures.  Turtle soup in particular is much enjoyed.  Fat from turtles is also used as a main ingredient in some cosmetics.

The world's total catch of turtles is 1,331 stone, with 1 source reporting. The total value of turtles equals 15,089 g.p. annually (5.67 g.p. per stone).

As treasure, 2½ lbs. of plundered turtles = 1 x.p.

The only commercial source for turtles is along the south coast of Sicily; by order of the King of Spain, distribution of these annual yield is controlled by the inland Sicilian market of Caltanissetta.

See Resources

Fish Fins (resource)

A food source yielding protein, used primarily in soups but also as a treatment for skin disease.  The fins are sold dried and are usually shredded for use, providing taste to the broth.  Considered a delicacy in certain Oriental courts, particularly Sheba and in China.  A lack of interest from much of the world ensures a small market.  In many places, particularly in Europe and America, dried fish fin has no sale value.

The world's total harvest of fish fins is 1,331 stone, with 1 fishery reporting.  The total value of fish fins equals 15,089 g.p. annually (11.33 g.p. per stone).

As treasure, 20 oz. (1¼ lbs) of plundered fish fins = 1 x.p.

The only commercial fishery for fish fins is in Sayhut, in the Hadramaut (formerly the Kingdom of Sheba).

See Resources

Seaweed (resource)

Also known as sea vegetable, a particular species of algae that can be harvested and eaten as food.  While much seaweed is toxic, edible varietis are eaten extensively in some parts of the world.  Agar, a glutinous substance used in the making of sauces, confectionary and a preservative; and carrageenan, a red edible seaweed, are used to make traditional dishes.  Agar has some medical applications.  Laverbread is a soft mush traditionally eaten with bacon, or with Hog's Pudding.

Seaweed oil (see Marine oil), is used as fuel and for soaps and lotions.

The world's total harvest of seaweed is 1,118 tons, with 4 guilds reporting.  The total value of seaweed equals 60,354 g.p. annually (53.97 g.p. per ton).

As treasure, 37 lb. of plundered seaweed = 1 x.p.

The largest seaweed harvesting guilds are Brittany, Devonshire, the O'Hara Clan in Eire and the Orkney Islands.

See Resources



Technologies

Art, skill or cunning in the creation of techniques, methods and processes used in the advancement of civilization as well as the production of goods and services.  Technology can be the knowledge of tools, but it can also reveal itself in the formulation of a particular stage of social and cultural development.

With the beginning of an intelligent species, as the first tools are employed, only a few technologies might be available.  But as technologies accumulate, so does the degree of civilization, until the most advance civilizations are those that incorporate all known technologies in that world.  Ultimately, there are always still more technologies ... but at any given time, only a set number will exist.

Because of geography, the limitations upon the most advance technologies and cultural resistance, different stages of development can coexist, even side by side: so that one state might possess considerably more technology than another.  Compare, for example, the city of Cairo with the Bedouin tribes dwelling less than a hundred miles away.  See Development Levels.

The following is a list of technologies according to their level of development:

Dev-5:  Fishing


See,
Campaign

Monday, January 14, 2019

Sponges (resource)

In economic terms, describes a type of aquatic animal, a certain kind of sponge with soft, fibrous skeletons.  The bodies of these particular sponges are soft enough to provide many uses, including padding for helmets, drinking utencils, natural filters, cleaning tools, applicators for cosmetics and paint, even as contraceptives.  Sponges also have natural properties that aid in resistance to viruses, bacteria, tumors and fungi.

Sponges are typically obtained through free-diving from a small boat, using a cylindrical glass object to search the sea floor for sponges.  A free-diver was usually naked and carried a 33 lb. weight, a rounded stone on a rope tied to the boat, to enable a swift sink to the bottom.  Depth and bottom time depended on the diver's lung capacity.

The world's total catch of sponges is 29,286 stone (14 lbs. per stone), with 11 fisheries reporting.  The total value of sponges equals 165,974 g.p. annually (5.67 g.p./stone).

As treasure, 2½ lbs. of plundered sponges = 1 x.p.

The largest sponge fishing provinces in order of importance are the Dodecanese Islands, Tripolitania, Cyrenaica, Cyprus, Sfax and Tarabulus, all within the Ottoman Empire.

See Resources

Shellfish (resource)

Primarily used as a food supply consisting of aquatic shelled creatures, including mollusks and crustaceans, whether harvested from salt or freshwater environments.  Some creatures are caught in traps that are lowered into the sea and drawn up at set times of the day; others are harvested at low tide, as the creatures are exposed.  Other methods employ divers, rafts and rope lines dropped into water as places for shellfish to populate.  Selective harvesting encourages a continued food supply.

The world trade system tracks 7 species of shellfish, including crabs, crayfish, cuttlefish, lobsters, mussels, oysters and shrimp.

The world's total catch of shellfish is 21,089 tons, with 108 fisheries reporting. The total world value of freshwater fishing equals 1,707,398 g.p. annually (80.96 g.p./ton).

As treasure, 25 lb. of plundered shellfish = 1 x.p.

The largest shellfish producing nations in order of importance are England, France, the Netherlands, Naples (incl. Sardinia), Denmark, Ireland, the Ottoman Empire, Flanders, Iceland, Portugal, Spain and Sweden.

See Resources

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Fish (freshwater) (resource)

These are fish that spend the larger part of their lives in fresh water, such as rivers and lakes.  Most of these fish are caught with angling or with nets thrown from small boats.  Some large fishing boats operate on large lakes.  Ice fishing does not create economically important catches.  A large proportion of caught freshwater fish are never sold in a market.

The world trade system tracks 10 species of freshwater fish, including catfish, derekh, eels, ling, perch, pike, salmon, tilapia, trout and whitefish.

The world's total catch of freshwater fish is 50,806 tons, with 273 fisheries reporting.  The total world value of freshwater fishing equals 4,113,325 g.p. annually (80.96 g.p./ton).

As treasure, 25 lb. of plundered fish = 1 x.p.

The largest freshwater fishing nations in order of importance are England, the Ottoman Empire, Moskva, Eire/Ireland, the Holy Roman Empire, the Safavid Empire, the Spanish Empire, Magloshkagok, Vostoch and France.


Saturday, January 12, 2019

Resources (trade commodities)

In the game's trade system, resources refer to base produced materials that are not directly made from any other product.  Examples include ores and minerals, fiber crops, sawn wood, field crops, fruits, treenuts, tubers, vegetables and the following:

F
Fish (freshwater)Fish (saltwater) ~ Fish fins

S
Sea IvorySeaweedShellfish ~ Sponges

T
Turtles


See Trade System

Fish (saltwater) (resource)

Also called marine fish, this page describes fish caught as an economic resource that live in ocean water.  Small and large boats, from single-person craft up to ships as large as two-mast ketches harvest whatever fish can be reached, using lines and nets.  Large fishing vessels will travel up to thousands of miles ~ across the Atlantic most likely ~ to fish banks where the catch is at its greatest.

The world trade system tracks 28 species of saltwater fish, including anchovies, barbel, bonito, bream, carp, cod, flatfish, flounder, gudgeon, haddock, hake, halibut, herring, lamprey, lungen, mackerel, mullet, pilchard, pollan, roach, salon, sardines, shad, shark, sturgeon, tuna and vogla.

The world's total catch of saltwater fish is 79,914 tons, with 429 fisheries reporting.  The total world value of salt-water fishing equals 6,469,918 g.p. annually (80.96 g.p./ton).

As treasure, 25 lb. of plundered fish = 1 x.p.

The largest saltwater fishing regions in order of importance are France, England, Naples (incl. Sicily & Sardinia), Spain, Ottoman Empire (Mediterranean Sea only), Portugal, Denmark, Sweden, Ottoman Empire (Black Sea only), Ulthua

See Resources

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Frog (giant)

This post includes significant contributions from Tim Alberdingk Thijm. Thank you Tim. 

These terrifying, immense frogs are known to inhabit jungle and deciduous forests from central and southern India to southern China and Japan, as well as being known throughout Indochina and the East Indies.  They possess claws upon their feet, making it possible for them to burrow into soft earth, which they will do with great alacrity.  They have been known to create extensive underground tunnels, up to ten feet in diameter, in Burma, Kampuchea and in northern Borneo.  They do not possess the long tongues that their smaller cousins have.

Giant frogs have leathery bodies and large muscular arms.  When they attack, they will swing only one claw against enemies ~ but either claw might be used in a given round.  As nocturnal meat-eaters, they possess and extremely good night-vision and are a terror in forested regions at night.  They will often partly bury themselves in soft loam, laying in wait and attacking prey as it passes.  They rarely hunt prey.

Advantages

In combat, the first time it is struck (whether or not it is stunned), the giant frog will produce an ear-splitting croak.  This will stun-lock all creatures within four combat hexes of the brobdingnagian monster for one round; those who then do not make saving throw against paralyzation will be deafened for 2-8 rounds thereafter, during which time they will be -2 in all their attacks (both to hit and damage).  Each giant frog is able to produce this croak but once per day.

The giant frog is able to move well and swing its mouth and claw, but it is most dangerous for its ability to hop a distance of 25 feet, or five combat hexes. It requires 1 action point to do this, and the frog can expend an AP at any time to hop. The giant frog will not hop away from a fight or retreat at all, but will always fight to the death. It can attack enemies in mid-hop if it uses its first AP.

See Bestiary

Frog (huge)

This huge African bullfrog (distinct from the American bullfrog, which has no huge form) dwells in wet habitats of East Africa and in a circle of lands surrounding the Indian Ocean, including India, Burma, Sumatra and even Australis.  With stiff bodies and multiple ridges over its back, this huge frog is able to let out a powerful croak that can be off-putting but has no real effect.

A rarely found subspecies of this frog has been encountered in subterranean parts of western Norway, but it is estimated their total number is less than three hundred.  They are meat-eaters and can be unusually aggressive.  They will usually lay in wait and attack prey as it passes.  They rarely hunt prey.

Advantages

The huge frog is able to ambulate somewhat, but it is most dangerous for its ability to hop a distance of 25 feet, or five combat hexes.  It requires 1 action point to do this, and the frog can expend an AP at any time to hop.  The giant frog will not hop away from a fight or retreat at all, but will always fight to the death.  It can attack enemies in mid-hop if it uses its first AP.

The huge frog has a tough, sticky tongue that can shoot out a distance of two hexes.  This will do some damage, but more importantly the enzyme on the surface will attach itself to its target. If the target weighs less than 150 lbs., the target must make a save vs. paralyzation or be swallowed as part of that attack. Larger creatures are assumed to have made their save, but the tongue will remain attached until the frog retracts it. A blow with a weapon causing 2 damage is sufficient; the tongue is considered to be AC 10, but the creature held by the tongue will be -4 to hit. Any other who are within reach can also attack the tongue. Damage to the tongue will not accrue to the frog, but the frog will not attack with its tongue again once it is damaged. A stun-locked frog will not release the tongue because it is stunned.

A swallowed victim will remain alive, but once inside the following must be noted: to begin with, the victim is still held by the frog's tongue; and in addition the victim is enclosed by the frog's mouth, so all attacks from inside must be done at -6 to hit. This is less a penalty against being able to find a target than it is for the victim to gain hold of their senses well enough to attack. The frog must be killed in order for the victim to free themselves.

The interior of the frog is AC 10. Meanwhile, enzymes in the frog's stomach will begin to work on the victim, causing complete sonambulance (sleep) after the victim has had three rounds to try to get free. After that, the victim has between 1 to 6 additional rounds before suffocating and dying.

Damage that is done to the frog from the outside will cause half that damage to a swallowed victim. For example, if 5 damage is done to the frog, 2 damage will be done to the swallowed victim. Nevertheless, the frog must be killed, and soon, if the victim is to survive at all.

See Bestiary

Frog (large)

These horned frogs, about as big as a large chest, have been found on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, in the rainforests of Central America, the Amazon and in Gambia.  They are round and heavy-bodied, with strong leathery plates for jaws that provide a bite force equivalent to a wolf.  They will swallow creatures as large as themselves.  They are naturally noctural and prefer to hunt at night.

They dwell in ponds, on the edge of large lakes and in rivers where the flow has grown slow and muddy.  They like to attack prey from beneath the surface of the water.  They emerge from fallen trees and pond-muck to search for food.  Large frogs are meat-eaters.  It will attack with its tongue and with a snap of its mouth.

Advantages

Though the large frog has a very slow movement, it can expend 1 of its action points to hop a distance of 20 feet, or four combat hexes.  This hop can occur at any time of its movement.  The large frog will not hop away from a fight or retreat at all, but will always fight to the death.  It can attack enemies in mid-hop if it uses its first AP.

Beelzebufo has a short, sticky tongue that can shoot out only a distance of one hex.  This will do a little damage, but more importantly the enzyme on the surface will attach itself to its target.  If the target weighs less than 70 lbs., the target must make a save vs. paralyzation or be swallowed as part of that attack.  Larger creatures are assumed to have made their save, but the tongue will remain attached until the frog retracts it.  A blow with a weapon causing damage is sufficient; the tongue is considered to be AC 10, but the creature held by the tongue will be -4 to hit.  Any other who are within reach can also attack the tongue.  Damage to the tongue will not accrue to the frog, but the frog will not attack with its tongue again once it is damaged.  A stun-locked frog will not release the tongue because it is stunned.

A swallowed victim will remain alive, but once inside the following must be noted: to begin with, the victim is still held by the frog's tongue; and in addition the victim is enclosed by the frog's mouth, so all attacks from inside must be done at -6 to hit.  This is less a penalty against being able to find a target than it is for the victim to gain hold of their senses well enough to attack.  The frog must be killed in order for the victim to free themselves.

The interior of the frog is AC 10.  Meanwhile, enzymes in the frog's stomach will begin to work on the victim, causing complete sonambulance (sleep) after the victim has had three rounds to try to get free.  After that, the victim has between 1 to 6 additional rounds before suffocating and dying.

Damage that is done to the frog from the outside will cause half that damage to a swallowed victim.  For example, if 5 damage is done to the frog, 2 damage will be done to the swallowed victim.  Nevertheless, the frog must be killed, and soon, if the victim is to survive at all.

See Bestiary

Friday, January 4, 2019

Blink (spell)

Range: self
Duration: 1 blink per level, up to one minute per level after the spell is discharged
Area of Effect: transfer up to 20 ft.
Casting Time: 2 rounds
Saving Throw: none
Level: mage (3rd)

Once the spell has been put into effect, the caster is able to begin each combat round by "blinking" a distance of up to four combat hexes.  The caster simply disappears from one location and reappears at another.  This transfer appears instantaneous to any onlooker; from the caster's perspective, the shift requires 12 seconds ~ one full round.  However, since this full round occurs on the Astral Plane, which the caster moves through, no time at all passes in normal space.

This transfer period allows the caster to orient themselves, so that they can be ready upon "blinking in" to act normally, unaffected by the shift in location and space.  During the round in the Astral Plane, a creature in that plane could be engaged in combat; but such an action would require initiative and a chance for both sides to attack.  If the caster were stunned, they would re-emerge in normal space and be stun-locked for one round.  The caster cannot control how much time they remain on the Astral Plane during each blink; it is always one round.  Note that the time can also be used to speak with a resident in that plane.  

However, the journey cannot be used to ready a spell or cantrip.  The spell or cantrip would be effective ... but once the return to normal space is accomplished, the magic is dispelled.  No effect that is initiated on the Astral Plane will have any effect in normal space ~ including anything gained from a magic item, a potion or a healing salve.  The time on the Astral Plane can be used to change weapons, however or to bring an item into hand.  During the journey, the caster is limited by the number of action points (AP) they possess, as always.

The transfer does require 1 AP to commence; once returning to normal space and time, regardless of what has happened on the Astral Plane, that 1 AP is spent and what happens after blinking-in again must account for that expenditure.  Thus a mage with five total action points spends 1 AP, jumps into the Astral Plane, has five total points to use there, then reappears in normal space has only 4 AP left.

The caster can only accomplish the blink once per combat round.  The blink cannot be done after any action has been taken (usually dictated by the expenditure of action points, but not necessarily).  The blink must happen at the start of the caster's round and at no other time.  The blink ignores all physical restraints, so that a box, or manacles, even the caster's clothes and equipment if wished, can be blinked out of and left behind.  Anything worn or carried can be brought along.

The caster is not required to blink in any given round.  They can, if they wish, skip round after round, then use up another of their blinks when it seems useful to do so.  The remaining blinks will remain possible for up to one minute per level after the spell has been put into effect (discharged).

Mage 3rd Level Spells

[Table yet to be created.]

blink ~ clairaudience ~ clairvoyance ~ cloudburst ~ detect illusion ~ dispel magic ~ explosive runes ~ feign death ~ fireball ~ flame arrow ~ fly ~ gust of wind ~ haste ~ hold person ~ infravision ~ invisibility 10 ft. radius ~ Leomund’s tiny hut ~ lightning bolt ~ Melf’s minute meteor ~ monster summoning I ~ protection from malevolence 15 ft. radius ~ protection from normal missiles ~ slow ~ suggestion ~ tongues ~ water breathing

See Mage